Thanks for logging in.

You can now click/tap WATCH to start the live stream.

Thanks for logging in.

You can now click/tap LISTEN to start the live stream.

Thanks for logging in.

You can now click/tap LATEST NEWS to start the live stream.

LISTEN
Watch
on air now

Create a 6PR account today!

You can now log in once to listen live, watch live, join competitions, enjoy exclusive 6PR content and other benefits.


Joining is easy.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Why majority of Australians suffer from ‘Nomophobia’

Steve Mills
Article image for Why majority of Australians suffer from ‘Nomophobia’

A new study has found an alarming amount of Australian smartphone users suffer from “nomophobia” – a fear of being without their mobile phone.

Lead researcher and PhD candidate at Monash University Fareed Kaviani told 6PR’s Michaela Carr 99.2 per cent of people suffer from nomophobia.

For some the fear is so severe it leads to dangerous and illegal use of the device.

“People that had severe nomophobia were up to 10 times more likely … to engage in prohibited use,” he said.

“People with severe nomophobia were also 14 times more likely to engage in dangerous use, such as using it while driving, or crossing the road without looking where you are going.”

The study found young people are most likely to have nomophobia because they have grown up with devices in their lives.

“Because the device has been so entrenched in their upbringing they are more likely to feel a sense of panic, discomfort, or nervousness in the absence of the phone.”

The study that was published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health found that “women were more likely to experience high levels of nomophobia”.

But men with the condition were more likely to engage in prohibited or dangerous use of their phones.

“Your relationships or your communication may not be as deep, complex, or as high quality as it could be if your phone wasn’t there interrupting you,” Mr Kaviani said.

The term nomaphobia has been around since 2014 but it is currently not a recognised diagnosis.

“There is an ongoing push to make it a recognised mental disorder,” he said.

Click play to hear the full interview. 

(Photo: iStock by Getty Images.)

Steve Mills
Advertisement