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Meet the collateral damage from Facebook’s actions

Oliver Peterson
Article image for Meet the collateral damage from Facebook’s actions

Chaos was caused today when Facebook restricted users in Australia from sharing or viewing local and international news content. The social media giant says the move is in response to the federal government’s proposed legislation to create a media bargaining code that would see them pay for news.

While the well-known Facebook pages belonging to media organisations were restricted, plenty of others were caught in the wake. DFES and BOM managed to have their pages restored, however other businesses who have no links to news publication are still struggling to get their pages returned.

One such business is EES Shipping, whose Managing Director told Oliver Peterson they believe they were affected because they use words such as “breaking news”

“Just because we say ‘an important update in the shipping world’ doesn’t mean we’re a news channel reporting to the world,” said Brian Hack

“It just shows what a knee jerk reaction from a global giant like Facebook can do to any business.”

While the logistical service provider has it’s own website, they use their Facebook page to provide timely communication. Mr Hack said even the local cricket club they sponsor has had their page restricted.

“Hopefully it gets sorted very soon but it seems like the shots have been fired.”

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(Photo credit: Supplied)

Oliver Peterson
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