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‘It’s not a kid’s party’ without this Aussie culinary delight

Oliver Peterson
Article image for ‘It’s not a kid’s party’ without this Aussie culinary delight

It’s been a tradition at Australian kid’s parties for nearly 100 years – white bread slathered with butter and topped with brightly coloured 100s and 1000s… also known as fairy bread.

After spending a weekend at kid’s parties, freelance journalist Celina Ribeiro decided it was time to write a column on Australia’s greatest culinary invention. She told Oliver Peterson despite more fashionable foods also gracing the table, fairy bread has “a hold” in Australian culture.

“Everyone keeps serving it because it’s not a kid’s party in Australia if you don’t have it,” said Ms Ribeiro.

There’s a right and wrong way to cut the bread with Ms Ribeiro saying it must be cut into triangles.

“Why would you cut it into a rectangle? It’s not correct,” she said.

Ms Ribeiro spoke with pastry chef author Katherine Sabbath who told her fairy bread is truly “accessible” by everyone. The cheapest white bread has to be used.

“It is sugary, greasy and cheap white bread – you can’t walk away from that,” said Ms Ribeiro.

Oliver Peterson
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