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Lance who?

Posted by: Paul Entwistle | 23 October, 2012 - 7:48 AM
Lance Armstrong has become 'He Who Must Never Be Mentioned' as cycling moves to wipe him from the history books.

Once considered the greatest rider in Tour history, the American was cast out on Monday by his sport, formally stripped of his seven titles and banned for life for his involvement in what US sports authorities describe as a massive doping program that tainted all of his greatest triumphs.

‘‘Lance Armstrong has no place in cycling and he deserves to be forgotten in cycling,’’ said Pat McQuaid, the president of the International Cycling Union.

McQuaid announced that UCI accepted sanctions imposed by the US Anti-Doping Agency and would not appeal them to the Court of Arbitration for Sport. McQuaid said he was ‘‘sickened’’ by some of the evidence detailed by USADA in its 200-page report and hundreds of pages of supporting testimony and documents.

The condemnation by cycling’s most senior official confirmed Armstrong’s pariah status, after the UCI had backed Armstrong at times in trying to seize the doping investigation from USADA.   

McQuaid said the UCI endorsed a life ban for Armstrong after almost two weeks studying the American agency’s evidence and will meet on Friday to discuss going after his 2000 Olympic bronze medal. It will also consider the re-attribution of titles and prize money from the Texan’s tainted races.

Tour director Christian Prudhomme said he no longer considers Armstrong to be a champion from 1999-2005 and wants him to pay back his prize money.

‘‘We wish that there is no winner for this period,’’ he said in Paris. ‘‘For us, very clearly, the titles should remain blank. Effectively, we wish for these years to remain without winners.’’

"Something like this must never happen again" ... International Cycling Union President Pat McQuaid.

"Something like this must never happen again" ... International Cycling Union President, Pat McQuaid.Photo: AFP

Armstrong’s representatives had no immediate comment, but the rider was defiant in August as he chose not to fight USADA in one of the agency’s arbitration hearings, arguing the process was rigged against him.

‘‘I know who won those seven Tours, my teammates know who won those seven Tours, and everyone I competed against knows who won those seven Tours,’’ Armstrong said then.

‘‘The toughest event in the world where the strongest man wins. Nobody can ever change that.’’

USADA said Armstrong had ‘‘the most sophisticated, professionalised and successful doping program that sport has ever seen’’ within his US Postal Service and Discovery Channel teams. He will lose all his race results since August 1998.

The agency welcomed the decision by UCI, following months of sparring between the two organisations.

‘‘Today, the UCI made the right decision in the Lance Armstrong case,’’ USADA CEO Travis Tygart said in a statement, which called on cycling to continue to fight doping. ‘‘There are many more details of doping that are hidden, many more doping doctors, and corrupt team directors and the omerta has not yet been fully broken.’’

The USADA report said Armstrong and his teams used steroids, the blood booster EPO and blood transfusions. The report included statements from 11 former teammates who testified against Armstrong, including that he pressured them to take banned drugs.

‘‘I was sickened by what I read in the USADA report,’’ McQuaid said, singling out the testimony of former teammate David Zabriskie.

‘‘The story he told of how he was coerced and to some extent forced into doping is just mind boggling."

’Armstrong denies doping, saying he passed hundreds of drug tests - he has claimed as many as 500. UCI conducted 218 tests and there were another 51 by USADA, although they are not the only drug-testing bodies. USADA’s report, released earlier this month, was aimed at showing why the agency ordered the sanctions against him.

‘‘At the moment Lance Armstrong hasn’t admitted to anything, yet all the evidence is there in this report that he doped,’’ McQuaid said.

While drug use allegations have followed the 41-year-old Armstrong throughout much of his career, the USADA report has badly damaged his reputation.   

Longtime sponsors Nike, Trek Bicycles and Anheuser-Busch dropped him last week, and Armstrong also stepped down last week as chairman of Livestrong, the cancer awareness charity he founded 15 years ago after surviving testicular cancer which spread to his lungs and brain.After the UCI decision Monday, another longtime Armstrong sponsor, Oakley sunglasses, cut ties with the rider but not his charity.

Armstrong’s astonishing return from life-threatening illness to the summit of cycling offered an inspirational story that transcended the sport. However, his downfall has ended ‘‘one of the most sordid chapters in sports history,’’ USADA said in its report.

The world’s most famous cyclist could still face further sports sanctions and legal challenges. Armstrong could lose that 2000 Olympic time-trial bronze medal and may be targeted with civil lawsuits from ex-sponsors or even the US government.


AP

Blog comments Your Say

  • I like what Cadels Evans said about cycling. He's a real gentleman.

    Rawlf Wednesday 24 October, 2012 - 5:17 PM
  • OK. So they decided he was 'guilty' BUT how come they drew this out for soo long? Who in USADA and/or the UCI found it in their favour not to do something about this earlier? Say back in 2005 when they had suspicions? They turned a blind eye and are giulty too.

    Rawlf Tuesday 23 October, 2012 - 12:36 PM

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